Record Review: S.H.I.T. - i 7"

S.H.I.T. - i 7" (La Vida Es Un Mus Discos Punk, 2017)
By Nathan G. O'Brien for Scene Point Blank

After making some waves around ye olden DIY hardcore scene circa 2014, these Toronto-ians took a little hiatus from recorded output (sans a couple live tapes). But now they’re back to kick of 2017 with this quick, four-song ripper. The titles of which all start with the letter I – “Insidiation”, "Incorporation”, “Information”, and “Individuation.”

The aura of leather jacket-clad arrogance that I’ve always appreciated is still intact, but they’ve evolved a bit. I mean, inasmuch as punk will allow while still being, you know, punk. They’ve integrated longer instrumental parts and scaled back on the snot-infused vocalization in favor of a smidgeon of decipherability. On the subject of the vocals, they’re kind of buried in the mix, giving off that demo tape vibe that this particular reviewer is quite fond of. Musicality-wise, it’s still that buzzing, noisy crux that we go gaga for but with a little wiggle room for each player to flex their chops.

While I’m of the belief that punk is best served via shorter releases, I’d really like to see where these guys will take things if they ever decide to go the seven-to-10 song 12” route. If the small flourishes of arty improvisation here are any indication, it would be what we in the business call, “killer.”

Originally posted here.


Record Review: Odio Absoluto LP

Rata Negra - Oido Absoluto LP (La Vida Es En Mus Discos Punk, 2017)
By Nathan G. O'Brien for Scene Point Blank

This is some killer punk out of Madrid, Spain on that throwback tip. If you had told me this was some recently excavated ‘80s gem getting the reissue treatment I’d have no reason not to believe you. Even the band photo used on the cover—which itself looks like it was clipped from an old photocopied zine kicking around your dad’s attic—looks like three loonies making the scene in ’82 or something.

Alluring, moody melodies float atop post-punk-informed instrumentation. A lot of stuff like has gained traction of over the last five years or so, and for good reason. The vocalist is the glue that ties this trio together. Her delivery isn’t abrasive, rather tuneful, but in a way that is still undeniably punk. This reminds a little of that that La Misma record from a couple years back (also on La Vida, go figure), albeit less aggressive.

There’s a handful of quick, to-the-point numbers here, but the longer songs—those that surpass the 2:00 minute mark—where they allow themselves some wiggle room, are the standouts. See “Por No Estar Sola” and “Viviremos Eternamente” for example. The latter of which makes me think of the Nic Cage movie Valley Girl, but for reasons that aren’t quite clear.

Originally posted here.